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The Only Country We Own

February 15, 2012 Leave a comment Go to comments

The Only Country We Own
Ronald Roy — 15 February 2012

Days 16, 17 and 18 of the impeachment trial of Chief Justice Renato C. Corona were absolutely disastrous for the prosecution panel. Those days once again showed the prosecution as so unprepared and bereft of evidence, that it is now crystal clear they have nothing to showcase but the shameless and damnably unprofessional practice known as “fishing expedition”. In the vernacular, the prosecution would be best described as “nagkakalat at nagsisinungaling”.

Now, one wonders how the prosecutors passed the Bar examinations, assuming they were enrolled in law school and, if they were and did pass the Bar, whether they understood the Lawyer’s Oath.

One wonders, if it is the defense or the prosecution that resorts to dilatory tactics that squander the public coffers for a trial that may well last over three hundred days.

One wonders how much longer Impeachment Presiding Officer Juan Ponce-Enrile and his senatorial colleagues can bear the onus of patience before pronouncing a possible mistrial.

Curiously, the CJ and his defense panel can thank P-Noy for his certifiable assaults—via trial by publicity and intimidating remarks by his subalterns— that have done well to portray the respondent as an underdog. They mindlessly ignore that Filipinos are by nature rooters for underdogs.

If you are reading this column, Mr. Aquino, think about it, if you can. I am sorry but I happen to believe, Sir, that you are a puerile and unfit occupant of your office because you lack the noggins for the job.

Sir, consider this: You who are fixated on the slogan “matuwid na daan” (straight path) are incapable of forming straight thoughts! You who are a marksman with revolvers and pistols keep hitting yourself in the foot! Saan ka ba magaling, Pangulong Aquino?  I advise you not to reply, Sir, lest you shoot yourself again in the same foot!

Texter #2919, I admit that as a journalist I find great difficulty in writing impartially about the ongoing impeachment case. Atty. Jose “Judd” Roy III is his own man with whom I sometimes disagree on legal and political issues. What we do share, however, is total respect for each other, and a calm comportment in the face of hostile opposition in general, and scathing remarks in particular.

I do not expect my readers to agree with me all the time, #2919, but please do not compare me with an incorrigibly biased columnist who thinks he looks great sporting Steven Segal’s ponytail, or that other journalist who enjoys wrecking chairs whenever angry at those who do not exalt P-Noy and his parents as perfect models of rectitude. Goodbye.

Here’s some interesting news coming from a private think-tank composed of seven professors from the academe, two clerics and myself: The impeachment trial is virtually over but the shouting!

In the next presidential election, we will all be witness to the Nationalista Party, Liberal Party, Nationalist People’s Coalition, GMA’s “defunct” forces, some sectarian organizations, and Puwersa ng Masa becoming the principal stakeholders in the electoral race scheduled for 2016,

Since by then P-Noy will have reached the end of his term of six years, he would naturally tap a successor he would need to nurse his legacy, whatever that might be. Would not this scenario then mean opening wide the field of presidential contenders?

Otherwise put, would it not make sense to suppose that a frenetic hankering among the contenders for the Presidency would indicate their wish that, come election time, P-Noy will have become so politically enfeebled as to disable him from endorsing a successor?

Would it not then be logical to suppose: that the ongoing trial of CJ Corona is an excellent opportunity to prevent P-Noy, while it is still early, from convicting the Chief Justice because if he succeeded in doing so, his current popularity would push his party close to  clinching another six years of power?

Admittedly, as of this writing, P-Noy still rides high on the crest of an SWS 70% approval rating. It is however the considered view of the think-tank that his lofty standing will rapidly ebb though the ensuing three and a half years, given the accelerating eco-socio-political conundrums arising from grinding poverty, endemic corruption, and climate change aberrations, not to mention global economic inflictions—all of which would naturally debilitate his governance.

Additionally, if reports are true, P-Noy’s disoriented plan to recruit Maoists like Jose Maria Sison in his government, and enlist NPA forces in the AFP—which he has in fact already done in the first case and which Fidel Ramos similarly did some 15 years ago in the latter case—will surely cause a dramatic plunge of his popularity.

 The think-tank has come to grips with the sad reality that, whether Filipinos like it or not, presidential elections trigger the usual wild scurries for the coveted office. It has likewise come to accept that, as in all previous elections, fair play will take a back seat in 2016.

The think-tank seriously notes that the 13-10 vote on the TRO issue, seemingly in favor of CJ Corona, could be misleading as to the ultimate verdict of his guilt or innocence.,

This notwithstanding, the think-tank stands four-square on available data indicating that the country’s next Chief Executive will come from the Puwersa ng Masa. By connecting the dots, it is the educated reckoning by the think-tank and this writer that one: Chief Justice Renato C. Corona will be acquitted and two: his immediate voluntary resignation to avert a national conflagration will be appreciated and rewarded by a grateful citizenry.

Finally, a word of caution: A so-called “Plan B”—one which P-Noy’s sanctimonious yellow cult has promised to launch in the event of CJ Corona’s exoneration—is a factor beyond its divination. Should this political catastrophe come to pass, God save the only country we own.

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